What to Read?

By Kim Loggins-Saine

Are you an avid reader like me? If so, the question of what to read next is a nagging question. I decided to make an attempt of putting together a list of what to read. Wish me luck!

If you want to understand how trauma and its resulting stress harms us through physiological changes to body and brain, then I suggest The Body Keeps the Score. It is written by Bessel van der Kolk M.D.

https://www.amazon.com/Body-Keeps-Score-Healing-Trauma/dp/0143127748

If you want to have a better understanding of grief, I suggest The Smell of Rain on Dust: Grief and Praise. It is written by Martín Prechtel. https://www.amazon.com/Smell-Rain-Dust-Grief-Praise/dp/1583949399

If you want to learn more about your true self, I suggest Parts Work. It is written by Tom Holmes, PhD. You can also read Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model by Richard C. Schwartz, PhD.

https://www.amazon.com/Parts-Work-Illustrated-Guide-Inner/dp/0979889715https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Internal-Family-Systems-Model/dp/0972148000

If you want to learn more about our self-limiting beliefs that rob us of joy, then The Four Agreements, by Don Miguel Ruiz, is what I would recommend. https://www.amazon.com/Four-Agreements-Practical-Personal-Freedom-ebook/dp/B005BRS8Z6 or https://www.miguelruiz.com/the-four-agreements

I you are curious about how different blood types effect how we should eat, then Eat Right for Your Type, by Dr. Peter J.D’Adamo, is a great place to start. https://www.amazon.com/Right-Your-Type-Peter-DAdamo/dp/0061441848

If you enjoy thriller/suspense type of books, I suggest reading books by Iris Johansen or booking by Elizabeth Lowell

http://www.irisjohansen.com/booksh

ttps://www.elizabethlowell.com/

If you enjoy a sweet romance novel, Then my pick would be Catherine Anderson. Some of her books also feature people with disabilities and how they strive. These are my favorite books!

https://www.catherineanderson.com/

Since there are so many wonderful books are there, I am sure that I will be adding to this list as time goes by.

Children and PTSD

Just like adults, children can suffer from PTSD. The symptoms may look a little different in children, but it’s still PTSD.

First off, what is PTSD? PTSD is Posttraumatic stress disorder. This can occur after a very traumatic event. In prior history we associated PTSD with soldiers who had faced battle. Now we understand that it can affect anyone.

What can Cause PTSD in Children

  • Bad accidents, such as car wreck
  • Invasive medical procedures, especially for children younger than age 6
  • Animal bites
  • Natural disasters, such as floods or earthquakes
  • Manmade tragedies, such as bombings
  • Violent personal attacks, such as a mugging, rape, torture, or kidnapping
  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual assault
  • Sexual abuse
  • Witnessing the death of a loved one
  • Emotional abuse or bullying
  • Neglect

Signs and Symptoms of PTSD in Children

  • Have problems sleeping
  • Have nightmares
  • Feel depressed or grouchy
  • Not understand why they are crying
  • Change in eating habits
  • Feel nervous, jittery, or alert and watchful (on guard)
  • Lose interest in things they used to enjoy. They may seem detached or numb and are not responsive.
  • Have trouble feeling affectionate
  • Be more aggressive than before, even violent
  • Stay away from certain places or situations that bring back memories
  • Have flashbacks. These can be images, sounds, smells, or feelings. The child may believe the event is happening again.
  • Lose touch with reality
  • They may cling to the person that they feel safe with
  • Reenact an event for seconds or hours or, in rare cases, days
  • Have problems in school
  • Have trouble focusing
  • Worry about dying at a young age
  • Act younger than their age, such as thumb-sucking or bedwetting
  • Have physical symptoms, such as headaches or stomachaches
  • Sometimes PTSD in children can look like ADHD

What to do as a Parent

If you notice these changes in your child and they persist, talk to their doctor. Get your child into counseling and keep every appointment. Listen to your child when they want to talk about what happened. You have to admit that the event happened and acknowledge it for your child. Let the child’s school counselor know what happened so they can check in on your child. Talk to their doctor about medications that could help your child. Take it seriously! Don’t just pass it off as nothing. Understand that your child may need you more. They may cling to you because you are their safety net.

https://www.cdc.gov/childrensmentalhealth/ptsd.html

https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=post-traumatic-stress-disorder-in-children-90-P02579

Anxiety and Depression

https://beatingtrauma.com/

I would have to say that this is the most accurate description of anxiety and depression that I have seen. Often times you are so tired. It’s more of an emotional tiredness than a physical tiredness. You want to be productive, but either fear of failure or the tiredness stops you. It’s wanting to be with your family and friends, but the thought of being around people makes your anxiety go up and you start to feel overwhelmed. You want to be alone, because it feels safe and you want to feel loved. It’s wanting to close yourself off from everything and everyone and needing a hug from the ones that you love.

People who have never dealt with anxiety and depression don’t understand the constant battle.

It didn’t happen for a reason

Source https://www.facebook.com/theadversitywithin/

Often times people will tell us that “it happened for a reason” to try to make us feel better. However, sometimes it just pisses us off. When a loved one dies, it happening for a reason, does not make the grief any easier. It belittles our feelings and our grief. The greatest love is also the greatest grief. Share that with someone and let them express their love/grief for the one that they lost.

Trauma, Yoga, and Healing

Therapeutic yoga supports your journey of  healing from trauma, depression, anxiety, grief, pain, stress, and other obstacles the we all face in life.   Therapeutic yoga teaches us how to listen to your body and what it is trying to tell you.  You will also learn how to connect your mind,  body, and spirit. https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Body_Keeps_the_Score/vHnZCwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=0 In chapter 16 of book The Body Keeps The Score the author, http://Bessel van Den Kolk, MD talks about learning how to inhabit your body with yoga. One of the lines in this chapter that struck a cord with me was:

“Yoga is about looking inward instead of outward and listening to my body, and a lot of my survival has been geared around never doing those things. ”

Yoga is a powerful way to learn and apply Mindfulness. Research shows that yoga helps us reconnect our minds with our bodies and get “unstuck” from patterns of anxiety, depression, traumatic memory, or behavioral disorder. Yoga is an Accessible Practice. Everyone can practice yoga, no matter how old or young, mobile or limited, flexible or stiff, active or sedentary. Therapeutic yoga focuses on specific and individual needs. You can do it, no matter where you are starting from. If you’re looking for a way to deepen your recovery, or simply improve your quality of life, yoga is a gentle and effective method. 

If you are interested in more information on  Yoga classes that supports your journey of healing from life’s hardest stuff: trauma, anxiety, depression, grief, pain, etc. link on the link provided. https://www.facebook.com/yogaroad.withblair/ Blair can offer you information on her classes and her teaches techniques. (She is Amazing ya’ll!)