Depression

“Skye helped me manage my depression and start feeling better.  She gave me hope and the skills I needed change my thoughts and feelings.  I don’t know where I would be without her help.” ~M.A.

Depression can be managed. Want to learn more? Call today for a free consultation 706-864-5674

SkyeHelps is NOT a crisis center and is NOT equipped to handle emergencies! If you’re feeling suicidal or having thoughts of harming yourself or others, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Their number is 1-800-273-8255, and you can call them 24/7. You can also call 911 if you or a loved one is in crisis.

Depression Basics

For some, depression means feeling sad, but more often, it feels like moving through each day is like slogging through a swamp of molasses. For others, it might seem like everything that was once colorful is dull and gray – not really bad, but definitely not great. In some cases, all you want to do is sleep – or you would if you cared about sleep (you vaguely remember a time when you used to).

SkyeHelps will help you learn to manage your depression

At SkyeHelps, we work with each client to identify the reasons for depression and identify the unique traits that define how you feel. Then we help you learn to cope. Coping looks different for each person affected by depression, but all clients have certain things in common that make it possible to manage.

Our approach is empathetic and kind, and we place great value on your individuality. We help you build and grow as a person, providing you with the tools to manage depression.

Depression Help

Depression can be treated, and we want to help you. The first step is reach out to us and ask for help. When you take that first step – and we know that for some people it’s a very difficult thing to do – we will treat you with empathy and kindness. Your feelings are real. You’re not crazy, your feelings aren’t “dumb” or “stupid,” and you never have to justify how you feel – to us or anyone else.

When you’re ready, we’ll be here to help you.

If you’re feeling suicidal or having thoughts of harming yourself or others, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Their number is 1-800-273-8255, and you can call them 24/7.

How SkyeHelps approaches depression

The first thing to know is that we listen to you. The second thing to know is that we believe every person has worth (even if they don’t believe it themselves), and we treat every client with dignity and kindness. You are important.

Beyond those two facts, the answer becomes a little more technical: we have had our greatest success with a therapeutic method called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This approach can be explained as helping people learn to think about the things they feel. In essence, we give you the vocabulary to label your feelings and teach you how to think about the why and how of your feelings so you can manage them more effectively. As your therapy progresses, we will introduce more coping tools, eventually helping you get to a point where you can thrive on your own.

Some other things to know about depression

The word “depression” describes a couple of different mental health conditions.  Depending on the exact nature and/or severity of your symptoms, you might hear or read about thing like Major Depressive Disorder, Minor Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and Manic Depression. People like your family and friends might also use words like funk, blues, sad, or sadness. So, with this information in mind, one of the things we do during your consultation and intake interview is figure out which of these terms best describes what you’re feeling.

Sometimes people experience depression along with other mental health issues. For instance, it’s common for people to experience a combination of depression and anxiety. In other cases, it might be accompanied by major life changes such as the loss of a job, the death of a loved one, and divorce. These types of things are all associated with grief, the set of feelings – including depression – that arise when we experience loss. And other cases might be associate with trauma and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Consequently, it’s possible that your therapeutic process will begin by trying to sort out the complex jumble of feelings you’re experiencing.

Your depression can affect people around you. We’re not telling you this to make feel bad, just to explain a little bit more about the condition. You’re not a hermit – even if you wish you could be – and the way you feel will be evident to your family, friends, and co-workers. That said, many people excel at hiding their emotions, so the people might not realize that you’re dealing with depression. Instead, they will simply notice behaviors or attribute your words and your actions to your personality. Not to worry, though, because as you learn to manage your depression, the way you see yourself will change, which will lead to a change in how others see you.

In some cases, the way you feel can be a response to the way others treat you, just like their feelings might be a response to the way you treat them. If these people happen to be loved ones, we might recommend family counseling or couples therapy.

Depression Resources

We believe that educated clients are the best clients, and we encourage you to try and understand your circumstances to the best of your ability. After all, you know better than anyone else what you feel and think. Our job is to help you learn to think about and manage those feelings and thoughts in a way that helps you function more effectively and, eventually, thrive.

Depression Test. Do you suspect you might be dealing with depression, but you’re not certain? We recommend the Depression Test from Psychology Today. You can use their assessment to help you figure out what’s going on and then call us for a free consultation.

More About Depression Tests. There’s a very good explanation of the depression diagnostic assessments on MedScape’s Psychiatry Section. Please note that the actual assessments are not available from MedScape. However, if you reach out to us, we may use one of these tools to assist us as we determine the best way to help you. We usually use the Beck Depression Inventory.

The Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM). The DSM is a tool for psychiatrists, psychologists, counselors, social workers, and doctors. They use it diagnose psychological and mental health conditions, and the manual lists very specific criteria that help practitioners understand and distinguish between various disorders. Many entries also list “rule outs” that help professionals understand when someone does not have a particular condition or disorder. Depression is one of the conditions listed in the DSM, and if you want to know the signs of depression, the DSM’s criteria for depression are the most cited benchmark.

Other Web Sites. There are many excellent resources on the Internet for people who want to read about mental health issues in general and depression in particular. We recommend starting with MentalHealth.org, Psychology Today, and WebMD.

Make an Appointment

Click here to request an appointment or call or text 706-864-5674.

Location

Dahlonega, GA

Find the SkyeHelps private counseling offices on the second floor of the Sargent Building on the Square.
72 Public Square N., Ste. B
Dahlonega, GA 30533